Pre Eclampsia support

For Women & their families who have suffered with Pre Eclampsia, Eclampsia, HELLP syndrome, Pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) and related conditions.
 
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 Thyroid & PE in the BMJ today.

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Liz Pidgley
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PostSubject: Thyroid & PE in the BMJ today.   Tue 01 Dec 2009, 12:12 pm

Pre-eclampsia linked to thyroid problems

(Research: Pre-eclampsia, soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1, and the risk of reduced thyroid function: nested case-control and population based study)
http://www.bmj.com/cgi/doi/10.1136/bmj.b4336


Women who develop pre-eclampsia during pregnancy are more likely than other women to have reduced thyroid function (hypothyroidism), finds a study published on bmj.com today. It may also put women at a greater risk of thyroid problems later in life.

Pre-eclampsia is a serious condition where abnormally high blood pressure and other disturbances develop in the second half of pregnancy. Hypothyroidism is caused by insufficient production of hormones by the thyroid gland.

Although the exact cause of pre-eclampsia is still unclear, studies suggest that certain proteins may be responsible. Levels of these proteins rise during the last two months of normal pregnancy and increase to very high concentrations in women with pre-eclampsia. Studies also suggest that women with a history of pre-eclampsia have an increased risk of future cardiovascular and kidney (renal) disease.

So a research team based in the United States and Norway compared thyroid function in women who developed pre-eclampsia during pregnancy with those whose blood pressure remained normal. They also tested whether pre-eclampsia in a previous pregnancy was associated with risk of reduced thyroid function in later life.

Their findings are based on thyroid function tests from 140 healthy pregnant women taking part in a US trial who developed pre-eclampsia, 140 matched controls in the same trial who did not develop pre-eclampsia, and 7,121 women in a Norwegian study who were monitored for around 20 years after their first pregnancy.

In the US study, levels of thyroid stimulating hormone measured just before delivery were twofold higher in women who developed pre-eclampsia during pregnancy compared with those who did not.

This was strongly associated with excess levels of a particular protein (tyrosine kinase), which plays a key role in the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia.

In the Norwegian study, women who developed pre-eclampsia in their first pregnancy were more likely than other women to have high concentrations of thyroid stimulating hormone many years after the pregnancy. The association was particularly strong if pre-eclampsia had occurred in two pregnancies.

The authors conclude that women who develop pre-eclampsia are at a greater risk of hypothyroid function during their pregnancy and women with a history of pre-eclampsia are at greater risk of hypothyroid function many years later.

These findings could have important implications for the subsequent care of women with pre-eclampsia, they add. Not only should they be followed closely for the development of cardiovascular and renal disease, but consideration should also be given to monitoring for the development of reduced thyroid function and clinically important hypothyroidism.

Treatment might also prevent early cardiovascular disease in women with a history of pre-eclampsia, they say.

Further research is needed to understand how exercise therapy results in better outcome, they conclude.

Contact:

Dr Richard Levine, Senior Investigator, Department of Health and Human Services, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Division of Epidemiology, Statistics, and Prevention Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
Email: levinerj@mail.nih.gov

BMJ Article

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Lesley
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PostSubject: Re: Thyroid & PE in the BMJ today.   Thu 03 Dec 2009, 8:35 pm

Very interesting. I have recently been told my thyroid has a lot of over granulation so I now have to hav yearly blood tests to check for hypothyroidism especially as my mum has it. May have to pass this on to my gp. Idea
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Liz Pidgley
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PostSubject: PE Links to Thyroid Slowdown During & after Pg   Tue 27 Apr 2010, 1:44 pm

Preeclampsia Linked to Thyroid Slowdown During and After Pregnancy
Wednesday November 18, 2009

Research just published in the British Medical Journal has shown that women who develop the condition known as preeclampsia during pregnancy are more likely than other women to have reduced thyroid function (hypothyroidism) in the last weeks of pregnancy, and may also may face an increased risk of hypothyroidism later in life, even decades after the pregnancy. The greatest risk of hypothyroidism developing over time was seen in women who had more than one pregnancy in which preeclampsia occurred.
Preeclampsia occurs in an estimated 3% to 5% of pregnant women, and involves onset of high blood pressure and protein in the urine in a pregnant after her 20th week of pregnancy. The condition can be dangerous for both the mother and fetus.

The implications of the findings are for women who develop preeclampsia, in that they should be monitored for the development of cardiovascular and renal disease, as well as development of hypothyroidism.

http://thyroid.about.com/od/hormonepregnantmenopause1/ss/pregnancyguide.htm

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Jodie
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PostSubject: Re: Thyroid & PE in the BMJ today.   Mon 30 May 2011, 7:15 pm

This is really interesting as I now have a thyroid problem and am under an endocrinologist and taking a variety of medication. Thanks for sharing this information.
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